enmity


enmity
enmity, hostility, antipathy, antagonism, animosity, rancor, animus mean intense deep-seated dislike or ill will or a manifestation of such a feeling.
Enmity implies more than the absence of amity or a friendly spirit; it suggests positive hatred which may or may not be dormant or concealed
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I will put enmity between thee and the woman— Gen 3:15

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angry friendship is sometimes as bad as calm enmityBurke

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Hostility suggests strong and usually open enmity manifesting itself actively (as in warfare, in violent attacks, or in ostracism)
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the unremitting hostility with which . . . [these poems] have each and all been opposed— Wordsworth

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if we could read the secret history of our enemies, we should find in each man's life sorrow and suffering enough to disarm all hostilityLongfellow

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Antipathy and antagonism usually imply a temperamental or constitutional basis for one's hatred or dislike.
Antipathy suggests aversion or repugnance and often, in consequence, avoidance or repulsion of the person or thing hated
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inveterate antipathies against particular nations and passionate attachments for others should be excluded— Washington

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found it so hard to conceal his antipathy that he could not understand the way in which Dayrell went out of his way to cultivate his society— Mackenzie

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Antagonism stresses the clash of temperaments and the quickness with which hostilities are provoked or the spirit of resistance is aroused
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Karl Marx believed that the hostility of one nation to another will come to an end when the antagonism between classes within these nations vanishes

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some note of viceregal authority must have lingered in her voice for the caretaker's antagonism changed to a sort of bedraggled obsequiousness— Sackville-West

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Animosity and rancor denote emotions of such intensity or violence that they may, if not given release, provide the ground for active hostility.
Animosity usually suggests anger, vindictiveness, and sometimes a desire to destroy or injure what one hates
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the Bishop had let the parish alone, giving their animosity plenty of time to cool— Cather

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her hatred of the idea of it was intensified into a violent animosityBennett

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Rancor stresses bitterness and ill will amounting to malevolence; it often implies the nursing of a grudge or grievance
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'tis not my speeches that you do mislike, but 'tis my presence that doth trouble ye. Rancor will out: proud prelate, in thy face, I see thy fury— Shak.

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small wonder at her feeling an unchristian rancor against the nation which had caused his death— Forester

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Animus suggests less emotional violence than animosity, but it implies more definitely a prejudice or ill will that seeks to find expression
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there was no mistaking his intentions; he had transferred his animus to me, convinced I was to blame for his rejection— Heiser

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Analogous words: hate, hatred, detestation, abhorrence, loathing (see under HATE vb): aversion (see ANTIPATHY): malignity, malignancy, ill will, malevolence, *malice
Antonyms: amity
Contrasted words: friendliness, amicability (see corresponding adjectives at AMICABLE): *friendship, comity, goodwill

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • enmity — [en′mə tē] n. pl. enmities [ME enemite < OFr enemistie < VL * inimicitas < L inimicus: see ENEMY] the bitter attitude or feelings of an enemy or of mutual enemies; hostility; antagonism SYN. ENMITY denotes a strong, settled feeling of… …   English World dictionary

  • Enmity — En mi*ty, n.; pl. {Enmities}. [OE. enemyte, fr. enemy: cf. F. inimiti[ e], OF. enemisti[ e]. See {Enemy}, and cf. {Amity}.] 1. The quality of being an enemy; hostile or unfriendly disposition. [1913 Webster] No ground of enmity between us known.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • enmity — late 14c., from O.Fr. enemistié enmity, hostile act, aversion, from V.L. *inimicitatem (nom. *inimicitas), from L. inimicitia enmity, hostility, from inimicus enemy (see ENEMY (Cf. enemy)). Related: Enmities …   Etymology dictionary

  • enmity — index alienation (estrangement), belligerency, breach, conflict, contention (opposition), cruelty …   Law dictionary

  • enmity — [n] hatred, animosity acrimony, alienation, animus, antagonism, antipathy, aversion, bad blood*, bitterness, daggers*, detestation, dislike, hate, hostility, ill will, loathing, malevolence, malice, malignancy, malignity, rancor, spite, spleen,… …   New thesaurus

  • enmity — ► NOUN (pl. enmities) ▪ the state of being an enemy; hostility. ORIGIN Old French enemistie, from Latin inimicus enemy …   English terms dictionary

  • enmity — n. 1) to stir up enmity 2) to incur smb. s enmity 3) bitter enmity 4) enmity against, towards; among, between * * * [ enmɪtɪ] among between towards bitter enmity to incur smb. s enmity to stir up enmity enmity against …   Combinatory dictionary

  • Enmity — (Roget s Thesaurus) < N PARAG:Enmity >N GRP: N 1 Sgm: N 1 enmity enmity hostility Sgm: N 1 unfriendliness unfriendliness &c. >Adj. Sgm: N 1 discord discord &c. 713 Sgm: N 1 bitterness bitterness rancor …   English dictionary for students

  • enmity — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ bitter ▪ age old, lasting, long standing, old, traditional, undying ▪ He had earned their lasting enmity …   Collocations dictionary

  • enmity — noun (plural ties) Etymology: Middle English enmite, from Anglo French enemité, enemisté, from enemi enemy Date: 13th century positive, active, and typically mutual hatred or ill will Synonyms: enmity, hostility, antipathy, antagonism, animosity …   New Collegiate Dictionary


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